Billy and James - A Story Of Two Brothers - Kibble: Specialist services & support for young people facing adversity
Posted: November 30, 2020

When two teenage brothers came to Kibble, it was their first experience of living away from home. Facing difficult family circumstances, the transition to living with a foster family was never going to be easy, however with the right support the boys were able to turn their lives around. Both boys are settled in their foster family, they are growing in trust and confidence, and making significant progress in their education.

Billy, now aged 14 and his younger brother James (age 13), were the first children to be supported by Kibble’s Shared Living foster care service which combines family living with close support from practitioners in the home. The loss of the boys’ father had a profound effect on the family, including their mum who experienced poor mental health. Both boys became involved in anti-social behaviour and were falling behind in their education because they were not attending school. To keep them safe and offer stability, they were placed in temporary foster care.

The road ahead was not easy as the boys learned to adapt to life in another family. They regularly gravitated back to their community and spent most of their time on the streets. But in time, foster carers David and Suzanne gradually helped them to feel that they were safe and belonged, and eventually a bond was formed as the emotional barriers came down. Both boys were closely supported by a therapeutic practitioner, who also worked with their mum and foster carers. Collectively, they worked through emotions and behaviours and found ways to understand each other.

Fast forward six months and life is very different. Billy attends KibbleWorks each day and is gaining skills and qualifications. He’s currently applying for college to follow a career in welding. James is doing well at school and has been gaining experience in greenkeeping and mechanics.

^ Names changed to protect identity of the young people.

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